Where Am I?

Plan your link destinations with the vision impaired in mind.

When you add a link to a page, you can control where the link’s content appears. By default, it replaces the content in the current tab/window that contains the link. In other words, you stay in the same place. However, the HTML <a>, or anchor tag, includes an attribute: target. This attribute allows you to open the new content in a different tab or a different window. It could even be a parent tab to the one in which the link appears. For most of us with no vision disabilities, that distinction may be obvious. However, for the vision impaired, especially the blind relying on a screen reader, jumping to another location could be a total mystery. The problem is this. If a vision-impaired person wants to return to the previous content after reading the new content, what do they do? Do they press the go-back arrow? That only works when the new content replaced the prior content. Do they click the close box in the upper right corner? That only works if you display the new content in a new window. What if the new content replaced a parent window/tab? Getting back to where they were can be frustrating. Continue reading “Where Am I?”